Elementary Italian

Allows beginning students to use actively and understand the language in different situations through communicative activities and creative exercises. Conducted entirely in Italian. » read more »

Elementary Italian

Instructor in charge: Giuliana Perco

Course conducted in Italian

Allows beginning students to use and understand the language in different situations through functional communicative activities and creative exercises.

Course Requirements: Five hours per week. Weekly quizzes, two midterms and a final.

Required texts:

The Italian Project 1a, T. Marin and S. Magnelli. Edilingua 2013. ISBN 978-960-693-019-5

The Italian Project 1b, T. Marin and S. Magnelli. Edilingua 2013. ISBN 978-960-693-020-1

Una grammatica italiana per tutti  Vol. 1, A. Latino and M. Muscolino. Edilingua. ISBN 978-960-7706-70-6

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Recommended texts:

English Grammar for Students of Italian  3rd edition- S. Adorni, K Primorac. Olivia and Hill. ISBN 9780934034401

Prerequisites: None. Italian 1 presumes no former study of Italian.

Elementary Italian

ELEMENTARY ITALIAN

Course conducted entirely in Italian

This course is for beginners and focuses on developing basic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) in Italian. The course is taught in Italian. Italian, not English, will be spoken in class at all times; students will be exposed to authentic Italian material from films, songs, websites, and will have the opportunity to practice their listening and speaking skills on a daily basis.

At the end of the semester, students will be able to use Italian to talk about themselves, their family, town, friends, and interests, as well as to describe present and past events in Italian and to converse with peers about their everyday life.

Course Requirements: Five hours per week. Weekly quizzes, a midterm, an oral exam, final project and a final.

Required texts:

Textbook to be determined.

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Recommended texts:

English Grammar for Students of Italian  3rd edition- S. Adorni, K Primorac. Olivia and Hill. ISBN 9780934034401

Prerequisites: None. Italian 1 presumes no former study of Italian.

Elementary Italian, Session C (June 22 – August 14)

In Summer Session 2015, you have the opportunity to fit the study of Italian language conveniently into your schedule. Whether for purposes of personal enrichment, travel, deepening your appreciation of opera, or mastering fine Italian cuisine, this intensive course will provide you with a university level introduction to the beautiful Italian language.

This course is for beginners. Come and learn the basic proficiency (writing, speaking, and listening) in Italian during an intensive summer course!

The course is taught in Italian. Italian, not English, will be spoken in class at all times, so that you will be exposed to authentic Italian material from films, songs, websites, and will have the opportunity to practice your listening and speaking skills on a daily basis.

At the end of the semester, you will be able to use Italian to talk about yourself, your family, your town, your friends, and your interests. You will also be able to describe present and past events in Italian and to converse with your peers about your everyday life. You will be able to understand short dialogues, conversations, and clips from mainstream Italian films. You will also be able to write short compositions on a variety of topics.

Ten hours of lecture per week. Weekly quizzes, a midterm, an oral exam, and a final.

This intensive language course covers a normal 15-week semester of Berkeley language instruction in 8 weeks.

Prerequisites: None. Italian 1 presumes no prior study of Italian.

LANGUAGE PROGRAM ADVISING

Dr. Giuliana Perco, Supervisor of our academic year Italian Language Program, will answer your questions about placement in this course, course structure, and content of Italian Studies 1: gperco@berkeley.edu

Instructor Availability: The Italian Studies 1 instructor will be available beginning the first day of class, Monday, June 22. Contact information and office hours will be provided by the instructor at that time.

For enrollment and general questions, contact the department office:

Email: issa@berkeley.edu

Phone: M-F 8-5, (510) 642-2704

REQUIRED TEXTS:

“Una grammatica italiana per tutti” Vol. 1 (Edizione aggiornata) by A. Latino & M. Muscolino – Edilingua Edizioni, 2014. ISBN 978-88-9843-310-0

“The Italian Project 1a” (Student’s book, workbook and video activities) + CD-ROM +

audio CD – Edilingua Edizioni, 2013. ISBN 978-889-843-300-1

“The Italian Project 1b” (Student’s book, workbook and video activities) + CD-ROM +

audio CD – Edilingua Edizioni, 2014. ISBN 978-88-9843-301-8

“Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary: Italian/English, English/Italian.” Concise Edition, Wiley Publishing. ISBN 0-13-953639-6

RECOMMENDED TEXTS:

“English Grammar for Students of Italian” by Sergio Adorni and Karen Primorac – Olivia

& Hill Press; 3rd edition, ISBN-10: 0934034400, ISBN-13: 978-0934034401

Elementary Italian

Allows students to build on the language skills learned in IS1 to improve their proficiency in Italian. Use of communicative activities and creative exercises. Conducted entirely in Italian.

» read more »

Elementary Italian

Instructor in charge: Giuliana Perco

Course conducted in Italian

Allows students to use and understand the language in different situations through functional communicative activities and creative exercises. Conducted entirely in Italian.

Course Requirements: Five hours per week. Weekly quizzes, two midterms and a final.

Required texts:

The Italian Project 1b, T. Marin and S. Magnelli. Edilingua 2013. ISBN 978-960-693-020-1

The Italian Project 2a, T. Marin and S. Magnelli. Edilingua 2014.ISBN 978-960-693-021-8

Una grammatica italiana per tutti Vol. 1, A. Latino and M. Muscolino. Edilingua. ISBN 978-960-7706-70-6

Una grammatica italiana per tutti Vol. 2 (edizione aggiornata), A. Latino and M. Muscolino. Edilingua. ISBN 978-960-7706-96-6

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Recommended texts:

English Grammar for Students of Italian  3rd edition- S. Adorni, K Primorac. Olivia and Hill. ISBN: 9780934034401

Prerequisites: Italian 1 or equivalent.

Elementary Italian

Course conducted entirely in Italian

 

This course is for students who have already a basic knowledge of Italian and want to continue the study of the language. The course is taught in Italian. Italian, not English, will be spoken in class at all times, students will be exposed to authentic Italian material from films, songs, websites, and will have the opportunity to practice their listening and speaking skills on a daily basis.

At the end of the semester, students will be able to use Italian to talk about their life, to describe present, past and future events, to discuss their choices and opportunities. Students will be able to understand short dialogues, conversations, and clips from mainstream Italian films and to express their ideas both orally and in writing on a variety of topics.

Course Requirements: Five hours per week. Weekly quizzes, midterm, oral exam, final project and a final exam.

Required texts:

The Italian Project 1b, T. Marin and S. Magnelli. Edilingua 2013. ISBN 978-960-693-020-1

The Italian Project 2a, T. Marin and S. Magnelli. Edilingua 2014.ISBN 978-960-693-021-8

Una grammatica italiana per tutti Vol. 1, A. Latino and M. Muscolino. Edilingua. 2014. ISBN 978-960-7706-70-6

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Recommended texts:

English Grammar for Students of Italian  3rd edition- S. Adorni, K Primorac. Olivia and Hill. ISBN: 9780934034401

Prerequisites: Italian 1 or equivalent. Please contact Dr. Perco if you have a question regarding placement in this course: gperco@berkeley.edu.

Intermediate Italian

Taught in Italian

In this course students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture through the analyses of short stories, newspaper articles, films, and plays. Students will continue to build on the work done in Italian 2, striving for a higher level of sophistication and fluency in writing, reading, and speaking. » read more »

Intermediate Italian

Course conducted in Italian.

In this course students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture through the analyses of short stories, newspaper articles, films, and plays. Students will continue to build on the work done in Italian 2, striving for a higher level of sophistication and fluency in writing, reading, and speaking.

Weekly quizzes, 2 midterms, one oral presentation, and a final exam.

Required texts:

Immagina, l’italiano senza confini, A Cummings, C. Frenquellucci, etc. Vista Higher Learning 2011. ISBN 978-1-60576-260-9

Recommended texts:

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Prerequisite: Italian 2 or consent of instructor.

Intermediate Italian

Course conducted entirely in Italian

In this course students will review and expand the grammar structures learned in the previous year. They will also be exposed to more examples of Italian culture through authentic materials such as short stories, newspaper articles, films, and plays. Students will continue to build on the skills acquired in Italian 2, striving for a higher level of sophistication and fluency in writing, reading, listening and speaking. Conducted in Italian.

Weekly quizzes, midterm, oral exam, presentation, and a final exam.

Required texts:

Immagina, l’italiano senza confini, A Cummings, C. Frenquellucci, etc. Vista Higher Learning 2011. ISBN 978-1-60576-260-9

Recommended texts:

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Prerequisite: Italian 2 or placement test. Please contact Dr. Perco if you have a question regarding placement in this course: gperco@berkeley.edu.

Advanced Italian

Taught in Italian

In this course students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture through the analyses of literary texts, articles, films, and plays. Students will continue to build on the work done in Italian 3, striving for a higher level of sophistication and fluency in writing, reading, and speaking. Readings will be more challenging than in the previous semester, and will cover a wider range of topics. Excerpts taken from novels will be longer with a richer, more complex vocabulary and sentence structure.

Course Requirements

Five hours per week. Mandatory attendance. Weekly quizzes, midterm, writing assignments, one oral presentation, and a final exam.

Prerequisites

Italian 3 or consent of instructor.

Texts

STUDENTS TAKE NOTE! REVISED TEXTBOOKS 6/12/14!

Immagina, l’italiano senza confini, A Cummings, C. Frenquellucci, etc. Vista Higher Learning 2011. ISBN 978-1-60576-260-9

RECOMMENDED

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Advanced Italian

Course conducted in Italian

In this course students will gain an appreciation for Italian culture through the analyses of literary texts, articles, films, and plays. Students will continue to build on the work done in Italian 3, striving for a higher level of sophistication and fluency in writing, reading, and speaking. Readings will be more challenging than in the previous semester, and will cover a wider range of topics. Excerpts taken from novels will be longer with a richer, more complex vocabulary and sentence structure.

Weekly written assignments, two midterms, an oral presentation, and a final exam.

Required texts:

Immagina, l’italiano senza confini, A Cummings, C. Frenquellucci, etc. Vista Higher Learning 2011. ISBN 978-1-60576-260-9

Io non ho paura by Niccolo` Ammaniti. Einaudi, 2011 ISBN 9788806207694

Recommended texts:

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Prerequisite: Italian 3 or consent of instructor.

 

 

Advanced Italian

Course conducted entirely in Italian

In this course students will hone their language skills by reviewing the grammar structures learned so far. They will learn to appreciate Italian culture through authentic materials such as literary texts, articles, films, and plays. Students will continue to build on the work done in Italian 3, striving for a higher level of sophistication and fluency in writing, reading, and speaking. Readings will be more complex and will cover a wider range of topics. Conducted in Italian.

Weekly written assignments, midterm, oral presentation, and a final exam.

Required texts:

Immagina, l’italiano senza confini, A Cummings, C. Frenquellucci, etc. Vista Higher Learning 2011. ISBN 978-1-60576-260-9

Io non ho paura by Niccolo` Ammaniti. Einaudi, 2011 ISBN 9788806207694

Recommended texts:

Webster’s New World Italian Dictionary Concise edition ISBN 9780139536397

Prerequisite: Italian 3 or placement test. Please contact Dr. Perco if you have a question regarding placement in this course: gperco@berkeley.edu.

All in the Family: The Italian Family on the Page and on the Screen, Session C (June 22 – August 14)

All Reading & Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the second half or the “B” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

 Loud, numerous, close-knit: the image of the Italian family is well-known around the world. Films like The Godfather, in which honor and loyalty to the family are the only values that matter, have helped reinforce ideas about the Italian family as strong in the face of all odds. In this course we will think about the power this image has on families in Italy. How have they struggled to live up to or move away from the stereotype? Limiting ourselves to the film and literature from Reconstruction through today, we will look at texts and films in which the stereotype of the Italian family is reproduced, critiqued and transformed both on and off the page. We will consider the impact of different historical events on the representations and dynamics of family life. We will read poems, short stories, theatrical dramas and novel. Among the texts we will consider are De Cespedes’ The Secret (1952), Ginzburg’s The Wrong Door (1965), Tondelli’s Camere separate (1989), and Murgia’s Accabadora (2010). We will also look to the rich tradition of Italian cinema; some of the films we will watch include Visconti’s La terra trema (1948), De Sica’s Two Women (1961), Bellocchio’s Vincere (2009) and Ozpetek’s Loose Cannons (2010). We will read some theoretical work on the representation of kinship and gender as well as scholarly work on the strategies and language of literary and film analysis. Students will be encouraged to pursue the theoretical line of inquiry that most interests them as they develop individual research projects.

 All readings will be in English. Students from all majors and those still deciding majors are welcome.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the “A” portion of the Reading & Composition requirement or its equivalent. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1B/R5B courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition

Back to Basics: Classics of Italian Literature

All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the second half or the “B” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

In this course, we’ll explore the richness of Italian literature from its earliest manifestations to post-WWII. We’ll examine texts that stand witness to the peninsula’s tumultuous history, beginning with a fragmented set of city-states and ending with the failure of Fascism. How did writers respond to the various cultural and social developments that shook the peninsula? What is the relationship between literature and nation-building? In what way do works critique political and gender power structures? These are just a few of the questions we’ll pose as we read.

Course Requirements

Students are expected to attend and participate regularly. There will be three writing assignments throughout the semester (totaling a minimum of 32 pages, including drafts), as well as a number of mandatory grammar/stylistic workshops.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the “A” portion of the Reading & Composition requirement or its equivalent. Students may not enroll in nor attend R5B courses without completing this prerequisite.

Texts

Dante, Vita nuova

Boccaccio, Decameron

Petrarch, Canzoniere

Franco, Terze rime

Machiavelli, The Prince

Manzoni, The Betrothed

Goldoni, The Artful Widow

Collodi, Pinocchio

Marinetti, “Futurist Manifesto”

Aleramo, A Woman

Levi, Survival in Auschwitz

Calvino, Invisible Cities

Lampedusa, The Leopard

The Mystery of the Text: Unconventional Mysteries, Unconventional Tales, Session D (July 6 – August 14)

All Reading & Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the second half or the “B” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

What is a story? What assumptions do we make when we read a story? In other words, what conventions, techniques, or practices of narration are there to which we have become so accustomed that they seem invisible or taken for granted? Who talks and how and when does one talk in a narrative? How do narratives or stories sustain an illusion of reality? What happens when these conventions are challenged or subverted?

This course will investigate a diverse group of modern texts, such as Lakhous’ Clash of Civilizations Over An Elevator in Piazza Vittorio and Calvino’s If On A Winter’s Night a Traveler, texts which all center around or are structured by a mystery (missing persons in the former or misplaced manuscripts in the latter); these texts also manipulate, challenge, and subvert the conventions of story-telling. In other words, there is the mystery in the text as well as the mystery of the text itself.

Course Objectives:

Students will think critically about what commonly assumptions we have about how a story or a narrative is constructed. I want, in other words, for the invisible to become visible.

Students will be able to analyze how do the expectations of readers familiar with one genre shape the reception of a text.

Students will be able to carry out close readings of a text, examining how the various elements such as metaphor, rhetoric, and irony work together.

All readings will be in English. Students from all majors and those still deciding majors are welcome.

 Prerequisites: Successful completion of the “A” portion of the Reading & Composition requirement or its equivalent. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1B/R5B courses without completing this prerequisite.

 

 

 

 

 

Reading and Composition

Crime Fiction in Italy

All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the second half or the “B” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

This course considers the thriving crime genre, its history, developments, and permutations, within the Italian literary tradition. We will begin by looking at certain American and British detective stories as precursors to the early Italian crime novel and then focus on the twentieth-century Italian “giallo:” fictions of crime, mystery, and suspense. One of our main concerns will be how, and to what ends, the genre and its principle motifs are manipulated in modern and post-modern appropriations of the popular form. Moreover, we will look at the place of gender and, therefore the relationship between gender and knowledge, as it is constructed by generic norms. What happens when a woman sleuths? Does the possibility of female knowing alter the genre’s course, or change its stakes? In addition, we will ask what role the very site of Italy plays in fictions of mystery and crime. How and why is Italy employed as background, or even protagonist, of the scene of the crime?

All readings will be in English. Students from all majors and those still deciding majors are welcome.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the “A” portion of the Reading & Composition requirement or its equivalent.Students may not enroll in nor attend R5B courses without completing this prerequisite.

Texts

Forthcoming.

Reading and Composition

Crime Fiction in Italy

All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the second half or the “B” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

This course considers the thriving crime genre, its history, developments, and permutations, within the Italian literary tradition. We will begin by looking at certain American and British detective stories as precursors to the early Italian crime novel and then focus on the twentieth-century Italian “giallo:” fictions of crime, mystery, and suspense. One of our main concerns will be how, and to what ends, the genre and its principle motifs are manipulated in modern and post-modern appropriations of the popular form. Moreover, we will look at the place of gender and, therefore the relationship between gender and knowledge, as it is constructed by generic norms. What happens when a woman sleuths? Does the possibility of female knowing alter the genre’s course, or change its stakes? In addition, we will ask what role the very site of Italy plays in fictions of mystery and crime. How and why is Italy employed as background, or even protagonist, of the scene of the crime?

All readings will be in English. Students from all majors and those still deciding majors are welcome.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the “A” portion of the Reading & Composition requirement or its equivalent. Students may not enroll in nor attend R5B courses without completing this prerequisite.

Texts

Forthcoming.

Reading and Composition: Mamma Mia! Stories of Parenthood between Tradition and Subversion

Mamma Mia! Stories of Parenthood between Tradition and Subversion

From Greek tragedy to contemporary novels and films, mothers and fathers have always played a central role in the fictional world. Often portrayed as bearers of traditional values, these archetypal figures acquire at times more complex dimensions in works that explore the depths of family relationships. In this course, we will take a close look at the institution of the family: What is a mother? What is a father? How do their roles differ – if they do – in shaping a child’s life? In what ways have these figures evolved throughout history?

We will use Italian culture as a point of departure for broader conversations around the question of family. Typically associated with clichés of overprotective mamme and benevolent, yet stern fathers, Italian culture displays a wealth of stories that complicate or even subvert such assumptions. Such stories will lead us to explore other multi-faceted representations of parenthood across time and space, from Euripides to American graphic novels.

 

The major goal of this course is to develop critical reading and writing skills for a broad range of analytical writing, with fictional texts serving as stimulating material for our practical goals. Through workshops, revisions, and collaborative work we’ll improve our ability to read a text, understand the writing process, and create interesting arguments. In addition to fictional works, we’ll read critical essays both as writing models and to engage our readings with their ideas. Attendance and engaged participation are therefore key to successful completion of this course.

 

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement.

Students may not enroll in nor attend R1A/R5A courses without completing this prerequisite.

No prior knowledge of Italian is required, and students from all majors are welcome.

 

Texts

Full texts:

 

Elsa Morante, Arturo’s Island

Alison Bechdel, Fun Home

Sibilla Aleramo, A Woman

Elena Ferrante, The Lost Daughter

 

We will also read a number of short stories, plays, chapters from novels, ranging from Sophocles to Euripides, from Edmondo De Amicis to Eduardo De Filippo, from Gavino Ledda to Italo Calvino, from Toni Morrison to Adrienne Rich.

 

Films

Vittorio De Sica, Bicycle Thief

Pier Paolo Pasolini, Mamma Roma

Roberto Benigni, Life Is Beautiful

Nanni Moretti, selections from Dear Diary

Reading and Composition: The Making and the Unmaking of the Eternal City

All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the first half or the “A” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

This course investigates literary and cinematic representations of Rome in the twentieth and twenty-first century. How is the “città eterna” appropriated as simultaneously a constant and fluctuating entity, a static emblem of history and a corrupting modern metropolis at once? What does it mean to author a city and how have writers and filmmakers taken on this role? How does Rome become a character of its own, one approached with an amalgam of loving curiosity, intolerance, even indifference? Furthermore, how does Rome strive to produce an Italian identity, while simultaneously repressing collective memory through its own architectural sign system? What kind of modern subject walks the Roman streets and how do they interact with it? These are some of the questions this course address by way of close readings of poems, short stories, novels and films.

Course Requirements

Students are expected to attend class regularly and to participate actively in discussions of the assigned reading. Since the purpose of the course is to enhance your skills as critical readers and writers, we will work on (among other elements) developing confidence and fluency in approaching texts, close readings, understanding the writing process, and learning to ask productive questions. Short reading responses will prepare you for the formal essays, and revision of these essays will be a central component of the course.

Texts: TBA

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1A/R5A courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition

Watch this Space!

The Description is Forthcoming!

 All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the first half or the “A” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

A detailed description is forthcoming.

Texts: to be announced.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1A/R5A courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition: “Making It New”: Reading (Italian) Modernism

All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the second half or the “B” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Beginning in the nineteenth century and continuing through the twentieth, writers and artists were grappling with a unique moment in history and its attendant changes: the appeals and anxieties of urban life; new media and technologies that transformed the experience of time, space, and human labor; world wars and political upheavals. Imagining such newness activated innovative modes of artistic expression that attempted to give voice to these experiences and simultaneously break free from what was perceived as the burden of literary and cultural tradition. Yet, in coming to terms with the “new,” writers also found themselves revisiting “old” forms, ideas, and spaces—particularly in a country such as Italy, often described as belated or backward with respect to the rest of bustling, industrialized Europe. In this course, we’ll examine some of the intersections and contradictions surrounding what is known as the “modernist” period, in Italy and farther afield: tradition and innovation; speed and slowness; the urban and the rural; the mechanical and the natural. We will consider these topics, among many, through active class discussion and regular assignments designed to cultivate critical thinking and refine the writing process.

Texts will likely be selected from among the following:

Campana, Orphic Songs

Pirandello, Shoot! The Notebooks of Serafino Gubbio

Futurist manifestoes and poetry

Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

Eliot, The Waste Land

A course reader including poetry and prose by D’Annunzio, Govoni, Gozzano, Bontempelli, Svevo, Ungaretti, Montale, and others.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the “A” portion of the Reading & Composition requirement or its equivalent. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1B/R5B courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition

Watch this Space!

The Description is Forthcoming!

 All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the first half or the “A” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

A detailed description is forthcoming.

Texts: to be announced.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1A/R5A courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition: The Great Beauty? Art, Creativity, and Nostalgia in the West

All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the second half or the “B” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

 

This course will use Paolo Sorrentino’s 2013 film The Great Beauty to begin and end an investigation into the meanings and use of art, creativity, and nostalgia in the cultural tradition of the West. Students will analyze Renaissance and contemporary art, nineteenth and twentieth century literature, and postwar European and American cinema to consider the significance and function of art, creativity, and nostalgia in key texts of the West’s cultural development. In considering works by Raphael, Pollock, Celine, Breton, Pirandello, Fellini, and others, students will be trained to analyze interdisciplinary primary and secondary sources while developing their own research portfolio. Successful completion of the course will signify students’ increased intellectual maturity, competence in textual analysis, and satisfactory capacity to independently undertake significant research projects.

 

Texts: The required texts for the course are forthcoming.

 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the “A” portion of the Reading & Composition requirement or its equivalent. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1B/R5B courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition

Watch this Space!

The Description is Forthcoming!

 All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the first half or the “A” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

A detailed description is forthcoming.

Texts: to be announced.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1A/R5A courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition: The Making and Unmaking of the Eternal City

All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the second half or the “B” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

This course investigates literary and cinematic representations of Rome in the twentieth and twenty-first century. How is the “città eterna” appropriated as simultaneously a constant and fluctuating entity, a static emblem of history and a corrupting modern metropolis at once? What does it mean to author a city and how have writers and filmmakers taken on this role? How does Rome become a character of its own, one approached with an amalgam of loving curiosity, intolerance, even indifference? Furthermore, how does Rome strive to produce an Italian identity, while simultaneously repressing collective memory through its own architectural sign system? What kind of modern subject walks the Roman streets and how do they interact with it? These are some of the questions this course address by way of close readings of poems, short stories, novels and films.

Course Requirements

Students are expected to attend class regularly and to participate actively in discussions of the assigned reading. Since the purpose of the course is to enhance your skills as critical readers and writers, we will work on (among other elements) developing confidence and fluency in approaching texts, close readings, understanding the writing process, and learning to ask productive questions. Short reading responses will prepare you for the formal essays, and revision of these essays will be a central component of the course.

Texts: TBA

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the “A” portion of the Reading & Composition requirement or its equivalent. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1B/R5B courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition

Watch this Space!

The Description is Forthcoming!

 All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the first half or the “A” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

A detailed description is forthcoming.

Texts: to be announced.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement. Students may not enroll in nor attend R1A/R5A courses without completing this prerequisite.

Reading and Composition

Image and Identity: “Reading” the Portrait

All Reading and Composition courses must be taken for a letter grade in order to fulfill this requirement for the Bachelor’s Degree. This course satisfies the first half or the “A” portion of the Reading and Composition requirement.

How do we “read” portraits? On the surface level, they may seem to represent the uncomplicated likeness or essence of the sitter, forever fixed in time and space. Yet, while a portrait may at first seem to provide us with a stable identity, supported by a network of visual cues, it also offers ample room for revisionist interpretations, projections, and identifications. In this course we will study the ways in which portraits appear in novels, poems, films, and short stories, with the goal of thinking critically about characters’ responses to and interpretations of the images with which they are confronted. What secrets do they believe are to be extracted from the images or what truths do they think are concealed? How does the fixity of the portrait interact with narrative progression? How do these portraits seduce and/or repulse their viewers? And to what extent are people (primarily women) conflated with images? Throughout the course of the semester, we will engage with recurring themes of identity, gender, sexuality, and the uncanny in order to develop the skills necessary for thoughtful academic work.

Course Requirements

Students are expected to attend class regularly and to participate actively in discussions of the assigned reading. Since the purpose of the course is to enhance your skills as critical readers and writers, we will work on (among other elements) developing confidence and fluency in approaching texts, close readings, understanding the writing process, and learning to ask productive questions. Short reading responses will prepare you for the formal essays, and revision of these essays will be a central component of the course.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the UC Entry Level Writing Requirement.Students may not enroll in nor attend R1A/R5A courses without completing this prerequisite.

Texts

Camillo Boito, “A Body” (course reader)

Alfred Hitchcock, Vertigo (film)

Vernon Lee, “Oke of Okehurst” (course reader)

Edgar Allen Poe, “The Oval Portrait” (course reader)

Georges Rodenbach, Bruges-la-Morte, Dedalus European Classics, ISBN-10:1903517826 (ISBN-13: 978-1903517826)

Iginio Ugo Tarchetti, “A Spirit in a Raspberry” (course reader)

Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oxford University Press, ISBN-10: 0199535981 (ISBN-13: 978-0199535989)

The course reader may also include the following works:

Selected poems from Petrarch, Gaspara Stampa, Robert Browning, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Charles Baudelaire, The Mirror of Art: Critical Studies, excerpts

Selected secondary and critical texts

Advanced Conversational Italian

This course is designed to develop and enhance oral communication skills at an advanced level by means of conversational practice, role plays, discussion of readings, debate of issues, and use of audio-visual materials.

Weekly oral and written assignments, four oral presentations spread out over the course of the semester. A considerable portion of the final grade will be based on the overall progress and participation of the student.

Texts: TRAME, A Contemporary Italian Reader edited by Cristina Abbona-Sneider, Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-12495-8

Prerequisite: Italian 3 or consent of instructor.

Freshman Seminar

Culture & Politics in Italy since World War II: The Case of Pier Paolo Pasolini

Pier Paolo Pasolini–poet, novelist, filmmaker, cultural essayist, and political journalist–was Italy’s foremost public intellectual for twenty years beginning in the mid-1950s, and the passionate urgency of his work has lost none of its relevance to Italy’s complex and often troubled cultural and political situation since he was murdered in 1975. In this seminar we will read (in English translation) a rich selection of Pasolini’s poetry, fiction, and essays; view some of his most important and controversial movies; and consider the state of Italy today in light of Pasolini’s diagnosis of his country’s ills forty years ago. The course is designed to appeal to students from any academic background who are interested in Italy, politics, good movies, great literature, or any combination of the above.

This 1-unit course is taken on a Pass/Not Pass basis.

Prerequisites

Freshman standing.

Texts

Reader:

Pier Paolo Pasolini, The Ragazzi, translated by Emile Capouya

Pier Paolo Pasolini, Poems, translated by Norman MacAfee

Seminar on Dante (in English), Session D (July 6 – August 14)

The course aims to introduce lower-division students to the work of the greatest poet of the European Middle Ages. It will present a close analytical reading of Inferno (the best-known part of his masterpiece, the Divine Comedy), in the literary and cultural context created by the most significant of his earlier works: the autobiographical prose and lyric poetry of the Vita nova, and the linguistic and poetic theory of De vulgari eloquentia. All readings, primary and secondary, will be in English.

Texts:
Dante, trans. Stanley Lombardo, Inferno

Dante, trans. Andrew Frisardi, Vita nova

Dante, trans. Steven Botterill, De vulgari eloquentia

Prerequisites: None. This course is taught in English with readings in English.

Seminar on Dante (in English)

Taught in English.

The course aims to introduce lower-division students to the work of the greatest poet of the European Middle Ages. The poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) was a Florentine citizen active in his city’s cultural and political life up to about age 35. Political circumstances forced him to spend the second half of his life in exile. It was during this tumultuous time that he wrote one of the most stunning and influential works of world literature, the Commedia. From its beginning, Dante’s poem parallels the experience of exile from a spiritual standpoint: the poet represents himself as exiled from God. Throughout the poem, the earthly and otherworldly realms are presented as tightly interconnected. This class traces Dante’s footsteps as he proceeds through his spiritual journey of redemption: Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso.

Prerequisites: None.

Introduction to Italian Culture

Choice of 6 discussion sections.

This interdisciplinary course is designed as a broad-based introduction to the culture and history of the Italian peninsula, from the Middle Ages to the present day. Enhanced by visits from distinguished scholars of the Department of Italian Studies and other campus units, it deals with major works of literature, political science, the visual arts, music, and cinema–invoking names such as Dante, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Verdi, and Fellini–while setting Italy’s variegated culture in its social and historical context, from the medieval and Renaissance city-state through the arduous process of building the Italian nation to the contemporary Italy of mass media, social conflict, and political upheaval.

 Texts: Assigned readings will be posted on bCourses; the content of lectures will also count as part of the course ‘text’.

Prerequisites: None

Italian Culture

This interdisciplinary course is designed as a broad-based introduction to the culture and history of the Italian peninsula, from the Middle Ages to the present day. Enhanced by visits from distinguished scholars of the Department of Italian Studies and other campus units, it deals with major works of literature, political science, the visual arts, music, and cinema–invoking names such as Dante, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Verdi, and Fellini–while setting Italy’s variegated culture in its social and historical context, from the medieval and Renaissance city-state through the arduous process of building the Italian nation to the contemporary Italy of mass media, social conflict, and political upheaval.

Section 101: F 12-1, Scott Bishop

Section 102: F 2-3, Scott Bishop

Section 103: F 3-4, Scott Bishop

Section 104: F 12-1, Kate Noson

Section 105: F 2-3, Kate Noson

Section 106: F 3-4, Kate Noson

Texts: Assigned readings will be posted on bCourses; the content of lectures will also count as part of the course ‘text’.

Prerequisites: None

The Italian Renaissance

This Course is Cross-Listed with History of Art 62

The Italian Renaissance is often considered to be the beginning of modernity. This is because the Renaissance is the first coherent articulation of a number of ideas–from the role of the individual within society to the rise of capitalism– that are closely associated with notions of “modern”. In this interdisciplinary course, we will discuss the various aspects of Renaissance life and culture that made this era both distinct within and formative for the history of western society. We will focus primarily on art, literature and political philosophy to draw a picture of the major cultural forces shaping the Renaissance. You will encounter many famous figures, including Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and Miachiavelli, placing these within their social and historical context. Where possible, the readings will be from the Renaissance itself, either writings of the authors, poets and artists we are studying, or the words of contemporaries writing about them.

Course Requirements

2 papers (6 pages each), midterm, final exam.

Prerequisites

Course and readings are in English.

Texts

Kenneth Bartlett, The Civilization of the Italian Renaissance, A Sourcebook [Second Edition], University of Toronto Press, 2011, ISBN-10: 1442604859 ISBN-13: 978-1442604858

Course reader at University Copy

The Italian Cinema: Between Opera and Soundtrack: Italian Cinema 1945-2015, Session D (July 6 – August 14)

EVENING COURSE!

Lecture Course Control Number: 56225
Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday 5:00-7:00 p.m., 254 Dwinelle Hall
Film Screening “LAB” Course Control Number: 56230
Monday 5:00- 9:00 p.m., 179 Dwinelle Hall

This course is designed to trace of more than half a century of Italian cinema, of its most influential actors, directors, and their best-known works. We will move from the ruins of post-World War II Italy, depicted in Rossellini’s Paisan, to the surreal and haunting atmospheres of Fellini’s films; we will dive into Leone’s epic and operatic narratives, and we will discover the tension between rural and urban contemporary Italy in Rohrwacher’s The Wonders.

In particular, we will explore the intersection of the musical and the visual that characterizes so much of Italian film: while music is often considered a secondary dimension in cinema, we will discover how a film soundtrack interacts with and affects the visual dimension. In particular, we will concentrate on a specific genre that has been central in the construction of the Italian cinematic identity: opera.

We will focus on cinematic techniques (such as shots, framing, point of view, camera movements), on the relation between image and sound, and on specific historical and cultural events represented in each movie. We will discover how filmmakers and musicians can imagine different visual and sonic worlds, and we will ask ourselves how ambiguous and persuasive narrative structures are created: What makes a plot “operatic”? What does it mean for a soundtrack to be “realistic”? How does the rhythm of the music intertwine with the rhythm of the film?

Readings: (reviews, articles, and book chapters) about Italian history, cinema, and music will be available in the course reader

Films will include:

Luchino Visconti, Senso (1954)
Federico Fellini, Nights of Cabiria (1957)
Sergio Leone, Once Upon a Time in America (1984)
Luca Guadagnino, I am Love (2009)
Alice Rohrwacher, The Wonders (2014)

Operas will include:
Giuseppe Verdi, Il trovatore (1853)
Giuseppe Verdi, La traviata (1853)
Giacomo Puccini, Tosca (1900)

 

Prerequisites: The course is open to all. No prior knowledge of music, cinema, or Italian language is required.

 

Italian Language Tutor Training

The Italian language tutor training course offers a one-unit field study for Italian Majors and Minors, and for UC Berkeley students with an advanced language proficiency in Italian (equivalent to at least 4 semesters of language) interested in tutoring students studying Elementary Italian (first and second semester).

 

Tutors are responsible for 2 hours of drop-in tutoring per week, plus regular meetings with the Tutoring Coordinator to discuss pedagogy and second language acquisition issues. Tutoring schedule and class meetings will be discussed with the instructor at a later date.

Being a peer tutor for Italian is a great experience: you will help fellow students who have just begun to study Italian to appreciate it as much as you do; reviewing sticky grammar points for your tutees will improve your own language skills; finally, direct hands-on experience in this field will be a nice addition to your resume.
Peer-tutor must enroll in Italian 197 (juniors or seniors) or Italian 97 (sophomores) for 1 unit.

The enrollment process requires pre-approval by the course supervisor and the Chair of the Department before a Course Control Number can be issued by the department to enable tutors to enroll.

  •  Your first step is to contact the supervisor of the course, Dr. Giuliana Perco (gperco@berkeley.edu), and discuss with her your availability and eligibility as a tutor. Once your candidacy is approved, you’ll have to obtain formal approval from the Chair of the department (Prof. Barbara Spackman (spackman@berkeley.edu).
  • Your last step will be to meet with the Undergraduate Student Services Advisor, Ms. Kathi Brosnan (6303 Dwinelle). Ms. Brosnan will review the form and will give you the course control number to enable enrollment.  Her office hours are Monday-Friday 9:30-11:30 and 1:15-4:00

Italian Language Tutor Training

The Italian language tutor training course offers a one-unit field study for Italian Majors and Minors, and for UC Berkeley students with an advanced language proficiency in Italian (equivalent to at least 4 semesters of language) interested in tutoring students studying Elementary Italian (first and second semester).

 

Tutors are responsible for 2 hours of drop-in tutoring per week, plus bi-weekly meetings with the Tutoring Coordinator to discuss pedagogy and second language acquisition issues. Both your tutoring schedule and class meetings will be discussed with your instructor at a later date.

Being a peer tutor for Italian is a great experience: you will help fellow students who have just begun to study Italian to appreciate it as much as you do; reviewing sticky grammar points for your tutees will improve your own language skills; finally, direct hands-on experience in this field will be a nice addition to your resume!
To become a peer-tutor, you must enroll in Italian 197 (juniors or seniors) or Italian 97 (sophomores) for 1 unit. The enrollment process requires pre-approval before a Course Control Number can be issued by the department to enable tutors to enroll. The process is outlined below. The University mandates that you must obtain the permission of both your instructor and the Chair of the Department in order to enroll in this course.

 

  • Your first step is to contact your future instructor, Annamaria Bellezza (ambellezza@berkeley.edu), and discuss with her your availability and eligibility as a tutor. If she approves your candidacy, together you will fill out an independent study form which requires your signatures.  Once you’ll have her approval, you’ll have to obtain approval and a signature from the Chair of the department (Prof. Ascoli: ascoli@berkeley.edu) on the same form. You will need to meet him in person during his office hours (6325 Dwinelle). You can email him in advance and coordinate your visit.
  • Your last step will be to meet with the Undergraduate Student Services Advisor, Ms. Kathi Brosnan (6303 Dwinelle), and bring her the completed form. Ms. Brosnan will review the form and will give you the course control number to enable enrollment.  Her office hours are Monday-Friday 9:30-11:30 and 1:15-4:00.

Words in Action Study Group

Italian Studies 98 (Freshmen and Sophomores)

Italian Studies 198 (Juniors and Seniors)

Words in Action is a multilingual student performance taking place every year at the end of April. It is open to all UC Berkeley students taking a foreign language, at any level.  Students participating in the event will work in the language of their choice with a language instructor. You will learn to perform in front of a live audience and experience the thrill of doing it in a foreign language. You will greatly improve your speaking skills and have fun at the same time in a highly collaborative environment. The event will include ONE 10-15 minute performance per language. Contact Annamaria Bellezza for details at ambellezza@berkeley.edu

Advanced Grammar, Reading, and Composition

Course conducted in Italian

Required of majors

 

Italian Studies 101B is a reading and writing intensive course for students who are already proficient in Italian. Its goal is to help students improve their grammar and perfect their writing and reading skills, in preparation for advanced literature courses in Italian.

 

In Spring 2015, Italian Studies 101B will focus on the theme of migration, a social phenomenon that has marked Italian society, history and culture for a very long time.

In the first part of the semester we will learn and analyze the story of Italian emigration between the 19th and 20th centuries and after WWII. Later in the semester, the focus will be instead on the contemporary wave of immigration into Italy from other, less privileged countries.

 

A variety of authentic texts of a different nature, from literature, to news articles, as well as video, audio clips, and songs will be included in the materials for the course.
Course Requirements: Three 1-hour meetings per week. Monthly quizzes, several long and short compositions, a presentation, and a final examination.

 

Prerequisites: Italian Studies 4 or proficiency placement. Please contact Dr. Perco if you have a question regarding placement in this course: gperco@berkeley.edu.


 

Advanced Grammar, Reading, and Composition

Taught in Italian.

Required of majors and minors.

Italian Studies 101A is a reading and writing intensive course. Its goal is to help students improve and perfect their writing and reading skills, as a preparation for taking advanced literature courses in Italian. A variety of authentic material, including texts of different nature, video and audio clips, and songs will be included among the materials for the course.

This course is a pre-requisite for any other 100-level course in Italian Studies.

Prerequisites: Italian Studies 4 or proficiency placement. Please contact Dr. Perco if you have a question regarding placement in this course: gperco@berkeley.edu.

 

Texts: to be announced.

Advanced Grammar, Reading, and Composition

Taught in Italian

Required of majors

Italian Studies 101A is a reading and writing intensive course. Its goal is to help students improve their grammar and perfect their writing and reading skills, as a preparation for taking advanced literature courses in Italian.In Fall 2014, Italian Studies 101A will focus on some of the most persistent (and often misrepresented) stereotypes that characterize the perception of Italian culture and society abroad: fashion, design, food. Attention will be given to the historical, social, and cultural implications of such stereotypes. A variety of texts of different nature, video and audio clips, and songs will be included among the materials for the course. Â

Course Requirements

Three 1-hour meetings per week. Two 1-hour exams and a final examination.

Prerequisites

Italian Studies 4 or equivalent, or proficiency placement. Please contact Dr. Perco if you have a question regarding placement in this course: gperco@berkeley.edu.

Texts

To be announced.

History of Italian Culture

From Machiavelli to Shakespeare: the Renaissance World

Taught in Italian

As the names of Machiavelli and Shakespeare indicate, the legacy of the Renaissance is still very much present in our contemporary cultural consciousness, but what actually was the Renaissance? When did it start and what parts of Europe did it influence? Why did it coincide with one of the most dynamic and creative epochs in Western history, marked by the recovery of classical antiquity, the discovery of new worlds, the printing revolution and the establishment of a capitalist world-economy? To answer these questions the course will guide the students through some of the most important texts of the period, taking into account literature and art, science and politics, philosophy and religion. Along with Renaissance Florence, Rome and Venice, special focus will be directed to Shakespeare’s England to explore the ways in which the Renaissance was exported and appropriated outside of Italy, shaping the emergence of modern Europe. Alternating lectures with discussion sessions, the course will take advantage of the several resources available on the Berkeley campus, with visits to the Berkeley Art Museums and the Bancroft Library, to look closely at Renaissance books and art works.

Course Requirements

Regular attendance and participation, short oral presentation, quizzes, final paper.

Prerequisites

Consent of the instructor.

Texts

To be announced in class.

Reading Italian Literature

Course conducted in Italian

Fulfills Major and Minor Requirements in Italian Studies

Giro d’Italia: un viaggio nella letteratura italiana dal ‘300 ad oggi

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to Italian literary history through the reading of a variety of different genres, including poems, plays, novels and short stories from across the centuries, while also providing tools for the description and interpretation of the texts presented.

As we read these texts we will focus on the theme of la città, and consider how literary representations of the urban landscape reflect changes in Italian political and cultural history from the 13th century to the present.

Course Requirements: Assignments include 5 short papers, and 2 revisions, reading quizzes, a final exam, and an in-class presentation.

Texts:

Readings may include works by Dante Alighieri, Giovanni Boccaccio, Bernardo Dovizi da Bibbiena, Carlo Goldoni, Cleto Arrighi, Anna Maria Ortese, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Umberto Saba, Leo Bersani, Carlo Levi, Natalia Ginzburg, Peir Paolo Pasolini, Laila Wadia.

Prerequisites: Italian 101A or 101B or permission of the instructor.

Reading Italian Literature

Taught in Italian

Fulfills Major and Minor Requirements in Italian Studies

The aim of this course is to introduce a variety of literary kinds from over the course of the Italian tradition (1200 to the present), while providing basic tools for the description and understanding of the texts presented.

Texts: to be announced.

Prerequisites: Italian 101A or 101B or permission of the instructor.

16th-Century Literature: Italian through Media: Information and Power from Gutenberg To The Digital Revolution

Course conducted in Italian

Our present is often referred to as the ‘age of information’, marked by the expansion of knowledge-producing occupations and by the transformation of information into commodity and social good. By bringing history into media studies, this course will show that adopting a long-term perspective–and examining the similar concerns over communication that societies of the past had–can help to better understand our present ‘information society’. After a brief introduction on Antiquity and the Middle Ages, the course will focus on the ‘age of print’ and will examine how the printing revolution shaped the emergence of modernity, influencing its social, intellectual and religious tensions as well as the interactions within and outside of Europe. Along with print culture the course will devote substantial attention to the interaction between different media, taking into account handwritten texts and images (including visual arts and maps). Considering material objects and the emergence of modern collecting practices (museums, cabinets of curiosities), the course will also explore the anxiety created by the ‘information overload’ caused by the recovery of ancient civilizations and the discovery of new worlds. Alternating lectures and discussions, part of the course will take place at the Bancroft Library, at the Berkeley Museum of Art and at the Berkeley Museum of Anthropology in order to examine manuscripts and early printed books as material objects and to introduce students to pre-modern visual culture.

Texts: TBA

Prerequisites: Italian 101A and consent of instructor.

Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Literature and Culture

I nuovi media e l’ndustria culturale in Italia dall’Ottocento ad oggi: testi, storie, teorie

Taught in Italian

In questo corso esploreremo i rapporti fra i nuovi media, l’industria culturale, l’arte, e la cultura in Italia dall’Ottocento ad oggi.

Presteremo particolare attenzione alle tecnologie che piu hanno inciso sullo sviluppo artistico, culturale, e politico dell’Italia, come la fotografia, il cinema, la radio, e la televisione, nonche le tecnologie digitali contemporanee.

Per capire il significato di queste innovazioni e il loro impatto sulla societa italiana, analizzeremo testi primari come foto, film, programmi radio e tv, e siti web con la prospettiva dataci da vari testi storici e teorici, italiani e non.

Il corso sara condotto in italiano, con letture in italiano ed in inglese.

Course Requirements

Durante il semestre, gli studenti dovranno scrivere brevi saggi, fare 1-2 presentazioni, e consegnare un progetto finale.

Prerequisites

Italian 101A or B or consent of instructor.

Texts

Forthcoming!

Topics in Italian Studies: One Hundred Years Ago: Italy and the “Great War”

Course and readings in English

A century ago, the outbreak of the “Great War” brought about the dissolution of centuries old empires, the creation of brand new countries, and of the unstable terrain from which later ideologies developed. It also brought about a geographically, economically and socially different Italy.

In this course we will study and analyze how literature described and re-interpreted not only the grim experience of the war bloodshed and its consequences, but the years immediately before the war broke out and their ideologies. We will study works by Italo Svevo, Giuseppe Ungaretti, Emilio Lussu and the futurists, among others. Since WWI was the first “global war”, we will also read works by authors from other nationalities and cultures, such as Wilfred Owen and Jaroslav Hašek. Additionally, we will look at some examples in figurative arts of the time, from paintings to photography, while films related to the war, for instance All Quiet on the Western Front, Francesco Rosi’s Uomini contro (Many Wars Ago) and Federico Fellini’s E la nave va (And the Ship Sails On), will also be included among the class materials.

Ultimately, through this course, we will attempt to understand the variously faceted perceptions of the “Great War” from different cultural and historical points of view.

Reading reports, a midterm, a presentation and a final paper are required.

Prerequisites: This course is taught in English; previous knowledge of Italian is not required. Students with a background in Italian, however, are welcome to read some of the assigned texts in Italian.

Topics in Italian Studies

Disability, Difference and Desire in Italian Fiction and Film

In this course, we will analyze representations of disability in Italian literature and film, focusing on the relationship between bodily difference, language, and sexuality. Drawing from some of the basic tenets of disability studies, we will question assumptions about normalcy and ask what it means to characterize someone or something as “disabled.” We will put pressure on concepts such as “cure” and “wholeness,” and will investigate the ways in which these concepts are mobilized within the literary form. In particular, we will explore the role of language in creating, understanding, and/or challenging various definitions of disability. We will consider the importance of voice, speech, and silence in each of the texts we read, exploring the relationship between the characters’ modes of communication and the telling, or writing, of the narrative itself. Do norms of communication and speech contribute to an “outsider” status for disabled subjects? How do different types of communication and knowledge lead to different relationships to the body? Is the desire of a disabled character necessarily queer? In order to answer these questions, we will consider the relationship between disability and other marginalized groups, asking to what extent disability presents a set of issues and concerns apart from other categories of difference, such as gender, class or race. As a backdrop for our analyses of fictional texts, students will also learn about the disability rights movement in Italy and will read and engage with scholarly work in the field of disability studies.

Course Requirements

Aside from discussion and class participation, graded assignments consist of weekly reading responses, a short midterm essay (3-5 pages) and a final paper (5-7 pages). In addition, students will be expected to give two 10-minute presentations, one on a course reading and one presenting the final paper.

Prerequisites

None. This course is taught in English with readings in English.

Texts

Giuseppe Pontiggia, Born Twice ISBN: 037572768X

Dacia Maraini, The Silent Duchess ISBN: 155861222X

Paolo Giordano, The Solitude of Prime Numbers ISBN: 0143118595

A course reader will also be made available with selections from: Gianni Celati, Italo Calvino, Giovanni Boccaccio, Lennard Davis, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Harlan Lane, Kathi Wolfe, Simi Linton and others.

Dante’s Purgatorio and Paradiso

Course taught in English.

This close introductory reading of Dante’s Purgatorio and Paradiso (the second and third sections of the Divine Comedy) aims to guide readers through a complex and challenging poetic narrative, situate Dante and his work in their intellectual, historical, and cultural context, and discuss questions of ethics, aesthetics, interpretation, and critical practice raised by the enduringly provocative presence of this medieval masterpiece at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Previous acquaintance with the first section of Dante’s trilogy, Inferno, will be found useful but is not indispensable.

Course requirements: Students will write three short (2-3 pp.) response papers in the first half of the semester; thereafter, in consultation with the instructor, they will devise an individual project on which they will write a research paper. There will be no midterm or final exam.

Text: Dante Alighieri, The “Divine Comedy”, translated by Allen Mandelbaum (Everyman’s Library, ISBN 978-0679433132)

Prerequisites: None

Dante’s Inferno (in English)

Taught in English, using a parallel-text edition of Inferno.

A close introductory reading of Dante’s Inferno, aimed at guiding readers through a complex and challenging poetic narrative; situating Dante and his work in their intellectual, historical, and cultural context; and discussing the questions of ethics, aesthetics, interpretation, and critical practice raised by the provocative presence of this medieval masterpiece in the early twenty-first century.

Course Requirements

Students will be expected to participate in class discussion and write several very short (max. 2 pp.) response papers in the first half of the semester; thereafter, in consultation with the instructor, they will devise an individual project on which they will write a research paper (12-15 pp.). There will be no midterm or final exam.

Prerequisites

None.

Texts

Dante Alighieri, Inferno, translated by Stanley Lombardo (Hackett)

Topics in the History, Society and Politics of the Italian Peninsula: Sins Against the State

Accusations against the Catholic Church of brazen interferences with the political workings of the Italian state(s) are frequent and often come at the expense of the Church’s role as spiritual guide. However just as writers lament intrusions of religious authority in the secular realm, the language and imagery of the Church permeate many articulations of Italian politics, specifically when guidance of the fold bleeds into control over the citizenry.

In this course, we will examine the slippage between these two authorities—religious and profane—at moments of conflict and apparent harmony as well as attempt to chart the evolution of laws within the struggle to divide, or rather, better delineate the identities and responsibilities of Church and State. Our primary goal, as we interpret works spanning different media and time periods, is to grasp the scope and nature of how these entities are defined, by whom and to what end, in order to gain insight into the dynamism characterizing their interactions with each other and with the subjects they govern.

Moreover, while class discussions will acknowledge the socio-historical realities within which the authors of our texts worked (e.g. the Counter Reformation, the Enlightenment, the Risorgimento etc.), efforts will also be made to explore the fantastical, literary and utopian aspects in each of these authors’ reactions to the status quo and to the powers-that-be. In particular, we will look at the ways in which authors apply the discourse of one authority to conceive—and more significantly critique—the role of the other, seemingly opposite, entity. The vision of reality that subsequently results will allow us to not only measure the success (or failure) of the rules governing society, but also to question the boundaries protecting the self from the outside world.

Course Requirements: Regular attendance and active participation; quizzes; two papers; and a final exam

Texts: Online course reader with selections from Catherine of Siena, Dante Alighieri, Cesare Beccaria, Giordano Bruno, Marchesa Colombi, Veronica Franco, Galileo Galilei, Alessandro Manzoni, Niccolò Machiavelli, Matilde Serao, Torquato Tasso, and others

Prerequisites: Italian 101A or B or consent of instructor.

Studies in the History, Society, and Politics of the Italian Peninsula

L’anno che ha cambiato il mondo: storia e memoria del 1968

Taught in Italian

Questo corso ci portera’ indietro nel tempo per approfondire la conoscenza di un anno denso di cambiamenti rivoluzionari per la societa’ italiana. Il 1968 e’ l’anno della protesta degli studenti, delle lotte nelle piazze con la polizia, delle occupazioni nelle universita’. E’ anche l’inizio di un’epoca di libera sperimentazione sessuale e di ribellione alle norme familiari. La rivolta giovanile si concentra sull’arretratezza della societa’ italiana, ma si ispira anche a eventi mondiali come la lotta contro la guerra in Vietnam o il movimento per i diritti civili negli Stati Uniti. Con il ’68 si avvia una lunga stagione di lotta che durera’ fino alla fine degli anni Settanta e viene oggi spesso definita l’epoca degli “anni ’68”.

Seguiremo le orme dei giovani rivoluzionari, delle femministe, dei ribelli e dei “figli dei fiori” italiani per conoscere la loro critica alle relazioni di classe e di genere del tempo e comprendere quale sia stato il loro contributo al rinnovamento della societa’ italiana. Ci affideremo a studi storici, ma anche alla letteratura e al cinema di quell’epoca e dei decenni successivi, grazie all’opera di autori quali Luisa Passerini, Guido Viale, Dacia Maraini, Kristin Ross, Nanni Balestrini, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Nanni Moretti, Elio Petri. La nostra indagine si soffermera’ sulle ramificazioni del “fenomeno ’68” a livello mondiale e sulla radicalizzazione del conflitto sociale negli anni ’70.

Per finire, ci interrogheremo su cosa resti di quegli anni nella memoria odierna degli italiani. In particolare, cosa caratterizzo’ lo spirito del ’68? Cosa ci fa dire che una stagione storica si sia conclusa o sia invece ancora capace di influenzare il presente? E come possiamo riconciliare le narrative discordanti che ereditiamo dal passato?

Course Requirements

Course reader; content to be announced.

Prerequisites

Italian 101A or B or consent of instructor.

Texts
To be announced.

Topics in the History, Society, and Politics of the Italian Peninsula: Italy in the Age of Dante (1000-1350)

Cross-listed with History 149B, Sec 1

The history of medieval Italy is one of vivid contrasts: of beauty and brutality, freedom and tyranny, piety and blasphemy. The great poet of the Inferno summons us to consider such contrasts in nearly every canto: how can such stunningly beautiful language conjure images of such horrendous violence? This course explores the world that produced Dante, Giotto, and Saint Francis. It first traces the emergence of independent city-states in northern and central Italy after the millennium, emphasizing the particular conditions and experiences that created this distinctive medieval civilization. We will then focus on the culture of these vibrant urban centers using the artifacts they produced to discover the economic, social, religious, and political tensions underpinning them.  Were the divisions and inequities of this society central to its creativity?  We will explore with particular intensity the relationship between religion and society.  Special emphasis will also be placed on analyzing material and visual sources: do they tell a different story than the written sources?  Requirements include midterm and final examinations in addition to an essay based on primary sources.

 

Readings & Sources for Spring 2015 include,

 

Barbarossa in Italy, ed. & trans. T. Carson (New York: Italica Press,

1994).

Thomas of Celano, The Lives of Saint Francis of Assisi

(CreateSpace, 2014).

The Little Flowers of St. Francis, trans. Raphael Brown (Colorado

Springs: Image Books, 1971).

Roberto Rossellini, Francesco, giullare di Dio (1950; restored ed.,

Criterion, 2005).

Dino Compagni’s Chronicle of Florence, ed. & trans. D. E. Bornstein

(Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1986).

Dante Alighieri, Inferno, trans. Allen Mandelbaum (New York:

Bantam, 1982).

Excerpts in translation of Geoffrey Malaterra’s Deeds of Count Roger,

Romuald of Salerno’s Chronicon, Muhammad al-Idrissi’s Kitab

          Rugiar, and Brunetto Latini’s Livres dou tresor.

Prerequisites: none.

The Italian Cinema

Lab/Screenings: W 3:30-6, 188 Dwinelle

This Course is Cross-Listed with Film 140, Sec. 4

An analysis of Italian cinema as seen in the development of specific film genres such as neorealism, comedy, or self-reflexive cinema.

A detailed description is forthcoming.

This course fulfills a film major requirement in history, genre or auteur based on the topic; fulfills an upper-division elective requirement for the Italian major or minor.

Texts: to be announced.

Prerequisites: None. This course is taught in English with readings in English.

Film and Literature: The Cinema of Italian Migration

This Course is Cross-Listed with Film 140, Section 4

Screening/Lab: TU 2:30-4:30, 188 Dwinelle

 

This course begins with the idea that modern Italy is a nation of emigrants, a premise well-illustrated by film and other forms of popular culture. Given the high numbers of Italians who have immigrated to the United States, this course examines film by and about Italians and their descendants in the United States in order to consider critically how cinema has shaped Italian and Italian American culture and history.

 

We will consider how iconic and often stereotypical imagery associated with Italian migration—the Mafia, religion, food, etc.—is commodified and at other times alternatively used to create new, hybrid ethnic identities. In so doing, students will evaluate the politics of representing immigration especially in relation to historical and contemporary policies and commonplace views on the topic. Ultimately, students will engage a varied set of critical and technical tools for unpacking how an Italian culture of migration and ethnicity is mediated in film.

 

The main focus of this course will be tracing cinematic examples by and about Italians and their descendants in the United States. However, given Italy’s complex relationship to migration—as both a nation of emigrants and a receiver of new immigrants—we will also consider some of the ways Italian films have taken on this subject. Films we will study include: The Black Hand, The Godfather II, True Love, Rocco and His Brothers, Big Night, Mean Streets, Lamerica, Io Sono Li, and The True Legend of Tony Vilar.

 

Textbooks

a course reader, more details forthcoming

 

Student requirements:

– Critical reflection papers on some of the required readings and films

– A final research paper

– Attendance and participation in class discussions

– (optional extra credit – in-class presentation on a pre-approved topic)

 

Prerequisites: None.

 

Italian Language Tutor Training

The Italian language tutor training course offers a one-unit field study for Italian Majors and Minors, and for UC Berkeley students with an advanced language proficiency in Italian (equivalent to at least 4 semesters of language) interested in tutoring students studying Elementary Italian (first and second semester).

Tutors are responsible for 2 hours of drop-in tutoring per week, plus regular meetings with the Tutoring Coordinator to discuss pedagogy and second language acquisition issues. Tutoring schedule and class meetings will be discussed with the instructor at a later date.

Being a peer tutor for Italian is a great experience: you will help fellow students who have just begun to study Italian to appreciate it as much as you do; reviewing sticky grammar points for your tutees will improve your own language skills; finally, direct hands-on experience in this field will be a nice addition to your resume.
Peer-tutor must enroll in Italian 197 (juniors or seniors) or Italian 97 (sophomores) for 1 unit.

The enrollment process requires pre-approval by the course supervisor and the Chair of the Department before a Course Control Number can be issued by the department to enable tutors to enroll.

  •  Your first step is to contact the supervisor of the course, Dr. Giuliana Perco (gperco@berkeley.edu), and discuss with her your availability and eligibility as a tutor. Once your candidacy is approved, you’ll have to obtain formal approval from the Chair of the department (Prof. Barbara Spackman (spackman@berkeley.edu).
  • Your last step will be to meet with the Undergraduate Student Services Advisor, Ms. Kathi Brosnan (6303 Dwinelle). Ms. Brosnan will review the form and will give you the course control number to enable enrollment.  Her office hours are Monday-Friday 9:30-11:30 and 1:15-4:00

Italian Language Tutor Training

The Italian language tutor training course offers a one-unit field study for Italian Majors and Minors, and for UC Berkeley students with an advanced language proficiency in Italian (equivalent to at least 4 semesters of language) interested in tutoring students studying Elementary Italian (first and second semester).

 

Tutors are responsible for 2 hours of drop-in tutoring per week, plus bi-weekly meetings with the Tutoring Coordinator to discuss pedagogy and second language acquisition issues. Both your tutoring schedule and class meetings will be discussed with your instructor at a later date.

Being a peer tutor for Italian is a great experience: you will help fellow students who have just begun to study Italian to appreciate it as much as you do; reviewing sticky grammar points for your tutees will improve your own language skills; finally, direct hands-on experience in this field will be a nice addition to your resume!
To become a peer-tutor, you must enroll in Italian 197 (juniors or seniors) or Italian 97 (sophomores) for 1 unit. The enrollment process requires pre-approval before a Course Control Number can be issued by the department to enable tutors to enroll. The process is outlined below. The University mandates that you must obtain the permission of both your instructor and the Chair of the Department in order to enroll in this course.

 

  • Your first step is to contact your future instructor, Annamaria Bellezza (ambellezza@berkeley.edu), and discuss with her your availability and eligibility as a tutor. If she approves your candidacy, together you will fill out an independent study form which requires your signatures.  Once you’ll have her approval, you’ll have to obtain approval and a signature from the Chair of the department (Prof. Ascoli: ascoli@berkeley.edu) on the same form. You will need to meet him in person during his office hours (6325 Dwinelle). You can email him in advance and coordinate your visit.
  • Your last step will be to meet with the Undergraduate Student Services Advisor, Ms. Kathi Brosnan (6303 Dwinelle), and bring her the completed form. Ms. Brosnan will review the form and will give you the course control number to enable enrollment.  Her office hours are Monday-Friday 9:30-11:30 and 1:15-4:00.